Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall accepting applications

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University

The Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University is accepting applications for its first class to begin in July at the Clifton and Nutley campus located 12 miles from Manhattan, the first private medical school to open in New Jersey in many decades.

The Hackensack Meridian Health Board of Trustees recently voted to establish a $100 million endowment fund for scholarships to the school, fulfilling a high priority to ensure top students can afford a medical education, said Robert C. Garrett, co-CEO of Hackensack Meridian Health.

The first class of 55 students will begin July 9, 2018 in the new school that aims to address the shortage of physicians in New Jersey. Nearly 1,000 applications have already been received. Thousands of prospective students are expected to apply.

The school will forge a new path in medical education to address profound changes which have resulted in more community-based healthcare and an increased focus on wellness and population health.

Along with opening the School of Medicine, Seton Hall University will relocate its College of Nursing and School of Health and Medical Sciences to create an Interprofessional Health Sciences (IHS) campus in Nutley and Clifton this spring, said Mary J. Meehan, Ph.D., interim president of Seton Hall University.

Students will train in a number of Hackensack Meridian Health’s 16 hospitals, four of which are among the top 10 in New Jersey – including the No. 1 ranked Hackensack University Medical Center, according to U.S. News & World Report.

Research shows that physicians often practice where they train which would help the state ease a shortage of an estimated 3,000 doctors in New Jersey by 2020.

Additionally, the innovative curriculum will help future physicians navigate major changes in health care that are underway in the United States including the transition to value-based care in which physicians and hospitals are paid to keep people well. It’s a major shift from fee-for-service medicine in which providers are paid for each treatment and procedure.

Medical students will develop partnerships with families living in stressed communities and work with them to jointly understand and overcome factors that can impede or contribute to well-being, ranging from access to grocery stores to taking advantage of new developments in telemedicine.

The new school is also unique in that it offers a three-year program, one of only a dozen or so in the nation to take this approach which can significantly lower the cost of a medical education.

For more information on the application process please go to WWW.SHU.EDU/MEDICINE.

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